A Miracle in Spanish Harlem


Hey all!

It’s that time of the season, Christmas trees, presents, snow, hot Cocoa and of course a great holiday movie with the family to warm the heart and enrich the soul. Speaking of which, I cordially invite everyone to go check out my cousin Derek Partridge’s new movie (A Miracle in Spanish Harlem) opening this weekend in a number of theaters across the country.
My sister Samantha also worked on costumes and I’m so proud of both 😉

Beautiful and alone, Eve (Telenovela superstar Kate del Castillo) feels a spark of romantic interest when she meets Tito, a widower struggling with the loss of a wife, the loss of hope and the loss of his faith. Tito is consumed by the pressures of caring for his children and trying to keep a failing business above water. His growing bitterness overshadows the best parts of his character and drives him to actions that will only add disgrace to his woes. Without a friend left on earth, nothing short of a miracle can relieve Tito’s crushing and solitary burdens. However, miracles have been known to happen…

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

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Blockbuster U.S. leaves physical retail, 2800 jobs lost


300 stores and remaining distribution centres to close by January 2014

Blockbuster

The Dish Network will close all remaining Blockbuster retail stores and distribution centres in the U.S., resulting in the loss of thousands of jobs.

Dish will call time on its Blockbuster retail business in January, 2014, with the DVD-by-mail service scheduled to close one month before. In total, around 2800 jobs will be lost in the process.

“This is not an easy decision, yet consumer demand is clearly moving to digital distribution of video entertainment,” said Dish CEO Joseph P. Clayton. “Despite our closing of the physical distribution elements of the business, we continue to see value in the Blockbuster brand, and we expect to leverage that brand as we continue to expand our digital offerings.”

Dish acquired Blockbuster for $320 million at auction after it filed for bankruptcy in September, 2010. Since then, the business has continued to struggle, trimming or selling assets both in the U.S. and abroad.

Blockbuster will continue to trade through its digital-only services, Blockbuster @Home and Blockbuster On Demand.

[source]

Activision Publishing CEO doesn’t want games to mimic movies


Eric Hirshberg says the medium is best suited to fantasy fulfillment, new consoles will fit right in with average user’s “multidevice daisychain”.

The non-stop bombast of a typical entry in the Call of Duty franchise may invite comparisons to the work of blockbuster film director Michael Bay, but Activision Publishing CEO Eric Hirshberg is wary of making games that mirror movies too closely. Speaking with Edge, Hirshberg said that was a trend he wasn’t interested in chasing.

“There’s this strange desire to morph games into movies or have them behave more like movies,” Hirshberg said. “I don’t share that desire. Games are wonderful as they are and do different things better than other forms of media.”

Hirshberg said the strength of the medium is in transporting players to experiences they can’t have in their everyday lives.

“Sometimes that’s driving a fast car, sometimes that’s being a professional athlete, sometimes that’s being a rock star, sometimes that’s being a hero or going into a fantastical future,” Hirshberg said. “I think this is inherently what games do best and so I’d expect that to be the basis of games for a long time to come.”

The executive also talked about hardware, specifically the new consoles set to launch next month from Sony and Microsoft. While the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 will allow developers to create more detailed graphics in their games, Hirshberg said the real innovations from the new hardware would arise from their designed integration with social services, smartphones, tablets, and other technology that simply wasn’t around when the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 were being designed.

“That whole suite of things we now can’t get through a day without didn’t exist when 360 and PS3 were launched, therefore they weren’t designed to particularly work well in those ecosystems – how could they [be],” asked Hirshberg. “Now the next generation of consoles is being designed to slot right in to be a part of that multidevice daisychain that we all have.”

The full interview with Hirshberg will be included in the new issue of Edge Magazine, which goes on sale today.

 

[source]

Nintendo wants to “change movies” with an interactive Zelda film


Nintendo wants to “change what a movie is” before it attempts a Legend of Zelda film adaptation.

 Zelda

Nintendo has been pretty conservative when it comes to spreading its properties out to other media. Legend of Zelda producer Eiji Aonuma told Kotaku that a possible Zelda adaptation would have to give audiences something completely different from their normal film experience.

“This is something that me and Mr. Miyamoto talked about,” Aonuma said. “If we were to make a Zelda title, if we had interest in doing that, I think really what would be most important to us is to be able to play with the format of a movie, make it more interactive, like you’re able to take your 3DS into the theater and that leads you into participating in it somehow. We wouldn’t want to make it the same as any other movie. We want to somehow change what a movie is.”

Disney’s been toying with second screen film experiences, with the release of the Little Mermaid: Second Screen Live in September. The experience uses an iPad app that syncs up with the film using the built-in microphone. Mashable tried out the app at a screening and found the film almost unwatchable due to the app.

“The games are distracting. Some moviegoers meeting Ariel and friends for the first time will find it hard to focus on the movie, with a new game every minute or two,” wrote Mashable’s Taylor Casti. Many games require an individual’s full attention, for instance, when players quickly pop bubbles or tilt the iPad to catch Ariel’s treasures in a chest. In fact, the games were so distracting, on multiple occasions key information was lost to gameplay.”

“Not to mention the voiceover and inter-theater competition, where up to four characters talk over the dialogue in the film to encourage players to compete with other audience members. As someone who grew up with Ariel, sure, the games were fun. But children seeing the movie for the first time missed seeing Triton destroy Ariel’s treasures; Ariel meet Eric for the first time; Ariel’s visit with Scuttle.”

Perhaps Nintendo could work around this with a film built specifically for interactivity? It is a way for Nintendo to continue to be unique, but Rovio and others seem perfectly fine making simple animated features. Is the company trying to reinvent the wheel for no good reason?

 

[source]